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75% of Pregnant Women at risk of giving birth to premature babies and by cesareans according to the finding of a Global Study

It has been found out in a medical research which entails the examination of 5000 pregnancy data in Asia, US and Europe that 23% of pregnant women do not gain enough weight recommended for pregnant women. More than 50% of pregnant women are also said to gain more weight than the recommended weight, this higher weight gain was more prevalent in western countries. This means that 75% are not getting the healthy recommended weight. The effect of this imbalance in weight is the increase in risk of premature birth, birth by caesareans and the prevalence of both obesity and excess gestational weight. Other important findings indicate that 7% of women were underweight and 38% were overweight at the time of pregnancy. Pregnant women having a higher weight gain are at a higher risk of having large babies which might lead to requiring a caesarean birth while women having lower weight are higher risk of premature birth.
A separate, landmark report released on by the Australian commission on safety…

75% of Pregnant Women at risk of giving birth to premature babies and by cesareans according to the finding of a Global Study



It has been found out in a medical research which entails the examination of 5000 pregnancy data in Asia, US and Europe that 23% of pregnant women do not gain enough weight recommended for pregnant women. More than 50% of pregnant women are also said to gain more weight than the recommended weight, this higher weight gain was more prevalent in western countries. This means that 75% are not getting the healthy recommended weight. The effect of this imbalance in weight is the increase in risk of premature birth, birth by caesareans and the prevalence of both obesity and excess gestational weight. Other important findings indicate that 7% of women were underweight and 38% were overweight at the time of pregnancy.
Pregnant women having a higher weight gain are at a higher risk of having large babies which might lead to requiring a caesarean birth while women having lower weight are higher risk of premature birth.

A separate, landmark report released on by the Australian commission on safety and quality in healthcare, found an increase in the rate of caesareans in Australia and varied with location. The Queensland area of Bribie Island had the highest rate of 438 per 1,000 women aged 20-34, and Victoria’s Baw Baw had the lowest, with 147.
The Atlas also found a seven-fold variation in the prevalence of hysterectomies, and a 21-fold variation in endometrial ablation.

How can these abnormalities in weight be prevented?

The result of the research emphasized an urgent need for monitoring and creating strategies and methods to correct the abnormalities.
  • A pregnancy gains of 12.5 kg to 18 kg for underweight women, 11.5 kg to 16 kg for women of healthy weight, 7 kg to 11 kg for overweight women, and 5 kg to 9 kg for obese women is recommended to correct these abnormalities.
  •  Health seminars and conversations should be organized for women before, during and after pregnancy.
  •  Effective simple health lifestyle interventions policies and routines should be incorporated and made available for all pregnant women.
  •  Another solution set in place by the Second Australian Atlas of Healthcare Variation is the analysis of data which includes hospitalization rates, surgical procedures, and complications, across Australian local areas. This data is expected to assist local clinicians and policy developers in identifying and addressing localized medical issues and health disparities.
  • Many women do not know their treatment choices, all treatment options should carefully explain to women and they should be offered a conservative therapy.
  •  Addressing social determinants of health, increased support for individual clinicians, and a greater focus on preventative health to reduce hospitalizations among 50 other recommendations should be put in place.


The message is clear: We all need to work together to make it possible for women everywhere to receive the care they need during pregnancy, labor and delivery as a starting point for successfully addressing the growing problem of child birth.

This involves simultaneous and coordinated action in the three main areas of service delivery, discovery and development. Although there are substantial gaps in our knowledge of the underlying causal pathways of pregnancy labor and delivery, we know there are proven interventions that need to be scaled up now. Governments and their partners must prioritize the equitable delivery of these interventions through innovative and cost-effective strategies. At the same time, basic research and discovery science must be promoted to build the evidence base so that effective preventive and treatment interventions can be designed. This will require collaborative partnerships across institutions and countries. As the evidence is generated, resources need to be allocated to its translation into new and better screening and diagnostic tools and other interventions aimed at saving maternal and newborn lives. The time is now to put this action plan into motion.

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